New Mexico statehouse districts avoid overall partisan bias

The New Mexico State Capitol, known as 'The Roundhouse.'
The New Mexico State Capitol, known as 'The Roundhouse.'

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The once-a-decade process of redrawing New Mexico’s state legislative districts has provided a relatively unbiased playing field for both major parties.

A statistical analysis by The Associated Press found Republican-skewed districts are far more common than Democratic ones in U.S. House and statehouse districts nationwide, though not in New Mexico.

New Mexico’s districts were drawn in 2012 by a specially appointed district court judge after the Democratic-led Legislature and Republican Gov. Susana Martinez reached a stalemate.

The share of seats won by Democrats in the House of Representatives in 2016 — 38 out of 70 — closely corresponds with average vote share in districts across the state.

Albuquerque-based pollster Brian Sanderoff says the boundaries of the state’s three U.S. congressional districts have changed little over the past three decades.