The Latest: Bill Cosby spokesman says town halls are planned

FILE - In this Saturday, June 17, 2017, file photo, Bill Cosby exits the Montgomery County Courthouse after a mistrial was declared in his sexual assault trial in Norristown, Pa. Judge Steven O'Neill who presided over Cosby's sexual assault trial is weighing whether to make public the identities of the jurors who deadlocked in the case. He said he would rule by Wednesday, June 21. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

PITTSBURGH (AP) — The Latest on the release of jurors’ names in the Bill Cosby sexual assault case (all times local):

6:15 p.m.

A spokesman for Bill Cosby says a series of town halls is planned to help educate young people about the problems their misbehavior could create.

Spokesman Andrew Wyatt tells a Birmingham, Alabama, TV station Cosby is eager to get back to work following a mistrial over the weekend in his suburban Philadelphia sexual assault trial.

Wyatt said Thursday the issue “is bigger than Bill Cosby” and can affect any young person, especially young athletes. He says young people need to know what they may face when “they’re hanging out and partying” and doing “certain things” they shouldn’t.

Cosby was accused of drugging and molesting a woman in 2004. He says the encounter was consensual.

A juror tells ABC News the jury couldn’t reach a consensus after voting 10-2 to convict on two counts against Cosby.

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1:10 p.m.

A juror in Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial says the panel was almost evenly split in its deliberations.

The juror told The Associated Press on Thursday that a similar number of jurors wanted to convict the 79-year-old entertainer as acquit him.

He’s the second juror to speak out after the jury deadlocked in the Pennsylvania case. A mistrial was declared Saturday after 52 hours of deliberations.

Another juror told ABC News that jurors voted 10-2 to convict Cosby on two counts. The juror who spoke to the AP confirmed that vote but said three people then changed their minds. He said the panel was typically more evenly split.

The juror spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity in order to discuss the sensitive deliberations.

— Associated Press writer Joe Mandak

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1:05 a.m.

A juror says after 52 hours of deliberations, two holdouts in Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial outside Philadelphia refused to convict the 79-year-old comedian.

The juror, who spoke to ABC News on condition of anonymity, says the jury couldn’t reach a consensus after voting 10-2 to convict on the first and third counts and 11-1 to acquit on the second count.

The juror says they initially voted overwhelmingly to acquit Cosby on all three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

ABC published the interview with the juror on Wednesday after Judge Steven O’Neill ordered the public release of the jurors’ names, granting a request by a dozen media organizations, including The Associated Press and the major TV networks.

The judge declared a mistrial on Saturday. Prosecutors plan to try Cosby again.