Today in History: October 25

Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger tells newsmen in Washington on Thursday, Oct. 25, 1973 that “there are limits beyond which we cannot go” in regard to the current situation in the Middle East. He said the United States will try to avoid a confrontation with the Soviet Union. (AP Photo)
Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger tells newsmen in Washington on Thursday, Oct. 25, 1973 that “there are limits beyond which we cannot go” in regard to the current situation in the Middle East. He said the United States will try to avoid a confrontation with the Soviet Union. (AP Photo)

Today in History

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 25, the 299th day of 2016. There are 67 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 25, 1962, during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council, U.S. Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson II demanded that Soviet Ambassador Valerian Zorin confirm or deny the existence of Soviet-built missile bases in Cuba, saying he was prepared to wait “until hell freezes over” for an answer; Stevenson then presented photographic evidence of the bases to the Council.

On this date:

In 1415, during the Hundred Years’ War, outnumbered English soldiers led by Henry V defeated French troops in the Battle of Agincourt in northern France.

In 1760, Britain’s King George III succeeded his late grandfather, George II.

In 1854, the “Charge of the Light Brigade” took place during the Crimean War as an English brigade of more than 600 men charged the Russian army, suffering heavy losses.

In 1929, former Interior Secretary Albert B. Fall was convicted in Washington, D.C. of accepting a $100,000 bribe from oil tycoon Edward L. Doheny. (Fall was sentenced to a year in prison and fined $100,000; he ended up serving nine months.)

In 1939, the play “The Time of Your Life,” by William Saroyan, opened in New York.

In 1944, New York socialite and amateur soprano Florence Foster Jenkins, 76, performed a recital to a capacity crowd at Carnegie Hall. (The next day, a scathing review by Earl Wilson in the New York Post remarked, “She can sing anything but notes.”)

In 1945, Taiwan became independent of Japanese colonial rule.

In 1954, a meeting of President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Cabinet was carried live on radio and television; to date, it’s the only presidential Cabinet meeting to be broadcast.

In 1971, the U.N. General Assembly voted to admit mainland China and expel Taiwan.

In 1983, a U.S.-led force invaded Grenada at the order of President Ronald Reagan, who said the action was needed to protect U.S. citizens there.

In 1986, in Game 6 of the World Series, the New York Mets rallied for three runs with two outs in the 10th inning, defeating the Boston Red Sox 6-5 and forcing a seventh game; the tie-breaking run scored on Boston first baseman Bill Buckner’s error on Mookie Wilson’s slow grounder. (The Mets went on to win the Series.)

In 1994, Susan Smith of Union, South Carolina, claimed that a black carjacker had driven off with her two young sons (Smith later confessed to drowning the children in John D. Long Lake, and was convicted of murder). Three defendants were convicted in South Africa of murdering American exchange student Amy Biehl.

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