Today in History: October 4

A throng of over 10,000 unemployed join in a "hunger march" as they mass at the Los Angeles Plaza Historic District to listen to the exhortations of Communist speakers, in Los Angeles, Calif., Oct. 4, 1933. The crowd was orderly. Plans for a parade were abandoned after the superior court had denied an application to restrain police from stopping the march. (AP Photo)

Today in History

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 4, the 278th day of 2016. There are 88 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 4, 1976, Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz resigned in the wake of a controversy over an obscene joke he’d made that was derogatory to blacks.

On this date:

In 1777, Gen. George Washington’s troops launched an assault on the British at Germantown, Pennsylvania, resulting in heavy American casualties.

In 1822, the 19th president of the United States, Rutherford B. Hayes, was born in Delaware, Ohio.

In 1931, the comic strip “Dick Tracy,” created by Chester Gould, made its debut.

In 1940, Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini conferred at Brenner Pass in the Alps.

In 1957, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite, into orbit. The television series “Leave It to Beaver” premiered on CBS.

In 1959, the Soviet Union launched Luna 3, a space probe which transmitted images of the far side of the moon.

In 1960, an Eastern Air Lines Lockheed L-188A Electra crashed on takeoff from Boston’s Logan International Airport, killing all but 10 of the 72 people on board.

In 1966, the African kingdom of Lesotho gained its independence from Britain.

In 1970, rock singer Janis Joplin, 27, was found dead in her Hollywood hotel room.

In 1985, Islamic Jihad issued a statement saying it had killed American hostage William Buckley. (Fellow hostage David Jacobsen later said he believed Buckley had died of torture injuries four months earlier.)

In 1990, for the first time in nearly six decades, German lawmakers met in the Reichstag for the first meeting of reunified Germany’s parliament.

In 1991, 26 nations, including the United States, signed the Madrid Protocol, which imposed a 50-year ban on oil exploration and mining in Antarctica.

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