Today in History: July 9

AP-South Sudan Independence
Southern Sudanese celebrate independence at midnight in Juba, Saturday, July 9, 2011. South Sudan became the world's newest nation early Saturday, officially breaking away from Sudan after two civil wars over five decades that cost the lives of millions. (AP Photo/Pete Muller)

Today is Saturday, July 9, the 191st day of 2016. There are 175 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On July 9, 1896, William Jennings Bryan caused a sensation at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago with his “cross of gold” speech denouncing supporters of the gold standard. Bryan went on to win the party’s nomination. On July 9, 1929, Hassan II, who ruled Morocco from 1961 to 1999, was born. Following his death on July 23, 1999.

On this date:

In 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read aloud to Gen. George Washington’s troops in New York.

In 1816, Argentina declared independence from Spain. 1850 Zachary Taylor, the 12th president of the United States, died in Washington, D.C., after serving only 16 months in office.

In 1896, William Jennings Bryan denounced supporters of the gold standard with his “cross of gold” speech at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

In 1974, Former Chief Justice Earl Warren died at age 83.

In 1992, Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton tapped Sen. Al Gore of Tennessee to be his running mate.

In 1995, the rock band the Grateful Dead played their last concert, at Soldier Field in Chicago, after a 30-year run, much of it spent on the road. (Lead guitarist Jerry Garcia died the following month.)

In 1997, Boxer Mike Tyson was banned from the ring and fined $3 million for biting opponent Evander Holyfield’s ear.

In 2002, the baseball All-Star game in Milwaukee finished in a 7-7 tie after 11 innings when both teams ran out of pitchers.

In 2004, a Senate Intelligence Committee report concluded the CIA had provided unfounded assessments of the threat posed by Iraq that the Bush administration relied on to justify going to war.

In 2011, South Sudan became the world’s newest nation, officially breaking away from Sudan after two civil wars over five decades that had cost millions of lives.

KRQE.com provides commenting to allow for constructive discussion on the stories we cover. In order to comment here, you acknowledge you have read and agreed to our Terms of Service. Users who violate these terms, including use of vulgar language or racial slurs, will be banned. Please be respectful of the opinions of others. If you see an inappropriate comment, please flag it for our moderators to review.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s