Today in History: June 8

A city policeman checks the credentials of three University of Alabama students at one of the numerous barricades surrounding the university campus, June 8, 1963 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. All declined to give their names. The barricades have been set up as part of the security involving the enrollment on Tuesday of two black students. (AP Photo/William A. Smith)

Today is Wednesday, June 8, the 160th day of 2016. There are 206 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlights in History:

On June 8, 1966, the strongest of a series of tornadoes struck the Topeka, Kansas, area, killing 17 people. A merger was announced between the National and American Football Leagues, to take effect in 1970.

On this date:

In A.D. 632, the prophet Muhammad died in Medina.

In 1845, Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tennessee.

In 1864, Abraham Lincoln was nominated for another term as president during the National Union (Republican) Party’s convention in Baltimore.

In 1912, the ballet “Daphnis et Chloe” was premiered by the Ballets Russes in Paris.

In 1915, U.S. Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan resigned over what he viewed as President Woodrow Wilson’s overly bellicose attitude toward Germany following the sinking of the RMS Lusitania.

In 1948, the “Texaco Star Theater” made its debut on NBC-TV with Milton Berle guest-hosting the first program. (Berle was later named the show’s permanent host.)

In 1953, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that restaurants in the District of Columbia could not refuse to serve blacks. Eight tornadoes struck Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, killing 126 people.

In 1967, 34 U.S. servicemen were killed when Israel attacked the USS Liberty, a Navy intelligence-gathering ship in the Mediterranean. (Israel later said the Liberty had been mistaken for an Egyptian vessel.)

In 1972, during the Vietnam War, an Associated Press photographer captured the haunting image of 9-year-old Phan Thi Kim Phuc (fahn thee kihm fook) as she ran naked and severely burned from the scene of a South Vietnamese napalm attack.

In 1978, a jury in Clark County, Nevada, ruled the so-called “Mormon will,” purportedly written by the late billionaire Howard Hughes, was a forgery.

In 1982, President Ronald Reagan became the first American chief executive to address a joint session of the British Parliament.

In 1996, China set off an underground nuclear test blast.

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