Today in History: April 11

The crew of the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission are shown in their space suits on their way to the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Kennedy, Fla., Saturday, April 11, 1970. Flight Commander James A. Lovell Jr., is waving, followed by Lunar Module pilot John L. Swigert Jr., and Command Module pilot Fred W. Haise Jr. An explosion on board forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. (AP Photo/NASA)

Today in History

Today is Monday, April 11, the 102nd day of 2016. There are 264 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On April 11, 1966, Frank Sinatra recorded the song “Strangers in the Night” for his label, Reprise Records.

On this date:

In 1689, William III and Mary II were crowned as joint sovereigns of Britain.

In 1713, the Treaty of Utrecht was signed, ending the War of the Spanish Succession.

In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln spoke to a crowd outside the White House, saying, “We meet this evening, not in sorrow, but in gladness of heart.” (It was the last public address Lincoln would deliver.)

In 1921, Iowa became the first state to impose a cigarette tax, at 2 cents a package.

In 1945, during World War II, American soldiers liberated the Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald in Germany.

In 1951, President Harry S. Truman relieved Gen. Douglas MacArthur of his commands in the Far East.

In 1965, dozens of tornadoes raked six Midwestern states on Palm Sunday, killing 271 people.

In 1970, Apollo 13, with astronauts James A. Lovell, Fred W. Haise and Jack Swigert, blasted off on its ill-fated mission to the moon.

In 1979, Idi Amin was deposed as president of Uganda as rebels and exiles backed by Tanzanian forces seized control.

In 1989, Mexican officials began unearthing the remains of victims of a drug-trafficking cult near Matamoros; one of the dead was University of Texas student Mark Kilroy, who had disappeared while on spring break. (Several cult members were later convicted of premeditated murder and sentenced to 50 years in prison.)

In 1991, the musical “Miss Saigon,” which sparked controversy over charges it was racist and sexist, opened on Broadway.

In 1996, seven-year-old Jessica Dubroff, who’d hoped to become the youngest person to fly cross-country, was killed along with her father and flight instructor when her plane crashed after takeoff from Cheyenne, Wyoming.

 

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