Today in History: April 5

Britain's Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, in doorway, centre, smoking cigar, leaves No. 10 Downing Street, London, to tender his resignation to Queen Elizabeth II, April 5, 1955, faced by a solid crowd of press photographers. (AP Photo/Stf)

Today is Tuesday, April 5, the 96th day of 2016. There are 270 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlights in History:

On April 5, 1976, during an outdoor demonstration against court-ordered school busing in Boston, a white teenager swung a pole holding an American flag at a black attorney in a scene captured in a Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph now known as “The Soiling of Old Glory” that was taken by Stanley Forman of the Boston Herald American. Reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes died in Houston at age 70.

On this date:

In 1614, Indian Chief Powhatan’s daughter Pocahontas married Englishman John Rolfe in the Virginia Colony. England’s King James I convened the second Parliament of his rule; the “Addled Parliament,” as it came to be known for accomplishing nothing, lasted two months.

In 1621, the Mayflower sailed from Plymouth Colony in present-day Massachusetts on a month-long return trip to England.

In 1764, Britain’s Parliament passed The American Revenue Act of 1764, also known as The Sugar Act.

In 1895, Oscar Wilde lost his criminal libel case against the Marquess of Queensberry, who’d accused the writer of homosexual practices.

In 1915, Jess Willard knocked out Jack Johnson in the 26th round of their fight in Havana, Cuba, to claim boxing’s world heavyweight title.

In 1916, Academy Award-winning actor Gregory Peck was born in La Jolla, California.

In 1925, a tornado estimated at F-3 intensity struck northern Miami-Dade County, Florida, killing five people.

In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order creating the Civilian Conservation Corps and an anti-hoarding order that effectively prohibited private ownership of gold.

In 1955, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill resigned his office for health reasons. Democrat Richard J. Daley was first elected mayor of Chicago, defeating Republican Robert E. Merriam.

In 1964, Army General Douglas MacArthur died in Washington, D.C., at age 84.

In 1986, two American servicemen and a Turkish woman were killed in the bombing of a West Berlin discotheque, an incident which prompted a U.S. air raid on Libya more than a week later.

In 1991, former Sen. John Tower, R-Texas, his daughter Marian and 21 other people were killed in a commuter plane crash near Brunswick, Georgia.

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