NM records 3rd Hantavirus death in 2014

This undated photo provided by the National Park Service, a deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). The deer mouse helps spread hantavirus to humans. Its head and body are 2-3 inches long, and the tail adds another 2-3 inches. Its coat varies from gray to reddish brown, depending on the animal's age. Found almost everywhere in North America, the deer mouse likes woodlands but also turns up in desert areas. An investigation of the hantavirus outbreak blamed for three deaths at Yosemite National Park recommends that design changes to tent cabins and other lodging run by private concessionaires first be reviewed by National Park Service officials. (AP Photo/National Park Service, John Good)
This undated photo provided by the National Park Service, a deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). The deer mouse helps spread hantavirus to humans. Its head and body are 2-3 inches long, and the tail adds another 2-3 inches. Its coat varies from gray to reddish brown, depending on the animal's age. Found almost everywhere in North America, the deer mouse likes woodlands but also turns up in desert areas. An investigation of the hantavirus outbreak blamed for three deaths at Yosemite National Park recommends that design changes to tent cabins and other lodging run by private concessionaires first be reviewed by National Park Service officials. (AP Photo/National Park Service, John Good)

SANTA FE (AP) – New Mexico health officials say a 28-year-old McKinley County man is the third person in the state to die from Hantavirus this year.

The Department of Health says there have been a total of six Hantavirus cases in the state this year. Those include a 49-year-old Otero County man who remains hospitalized but whose condition is improving.

Hantavirus is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings or saliva.

The deer mouse is the main carrier of the strain found in New Mexico, and the department says it’s important to seal homes and other structures during cold weather because mice may try to enter buildings for food or shelter.

The other fatal New Mexico cases involved a 67-year-old San Juan County woman and a 59-year-old McKinley County man.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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